frozenwithversaceice:

darvinasafo:

I’m seeing a trend within our youth…
BLACK EXCELLENCE

AND HE DID IT WITH GOLD CHAINS AND DREADS, GUESS YALL GOTTA DITCH THESE “THUG” STEREOTYPES NOW WHITE PEOPLE

frozenwithversaceice:

darvinasafo:

I’m seeing a trend within our youth…

BLACK EXCELLENCE

AND HE DID IT WITH GOLD CHAINS AND DREADS, GUESS YALL GOTTA DITCH THESE “THUG” STEREOTYPES NOW WHITE PEOPLE

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lovingcbreezy:

“@princesspiamia : Twinsssss!! With my big bro @chrisbrownofficial”

lovingcbreezy:

@princesspiamia : Twinsssss!! With my big bro @chrisbrownofficial”

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babycakesbriauna:

elegantpaws:

^THIS!

Ain’t that the truth!

babycakesbriauna:

elegantpaws:

^THIS!

Ain’t that the truth!

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disneylandguru:

Disneyland replaced individual ride tickets (in use since 1955) with its new passports (single admission price to the park) in 1982

disneylandguru:

Disneyland replaced individual ride tickets (in use since 1955) with its new passports (single admission price to the park) in 1982

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ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

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disneylandguru:

Mickey Mouse (playing the piano) was first added to Madame Tussauds Wax Museum, London in 1930.

disneylandguru:

Mickey Mouse (playing the piano) was first added to Madame Tussauds Wax Museum, London in 1930.

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disneylandguru:

A graceful young girl twirls across the screen, and movie magic is born. The girl on the screen is Snow White, and the movie in which she appears, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” will make screen history – Disney’s first full-length animated feature, a box-office phenomenon, and proof that animation could also be great art. But behind the fictional dancing princess was a very real girl. Marge Champion was only 13 when she was interviewed to become the live-action model for Disney’s first Princess, dancing and acting on film so that the animators could study her movements and make Snow White seem as real as possible on-screen.  we sat down and spoke with Marge Champion about modeling Snow White, working with Walt Disney, and coming of age at the Walt Disney Studios. Below, in her own words, is what she told us:
 ”My father was Ernest Belcher, the dean of the West Coast dancing masters. A representative of Disney came to my father’s dance school and picked three of us out of the class to go to the Disney Studio to be interviewed. I was 13 when they interviewed me, and at the end of junior high school. I didn’t hear from them all summer and I had totally forgotten about the interview – then suddenly, in September, when I was 14, I got a call asking me to come to the Studio, because they wanted to fit me into a mock-up of the Snow White costume. I had started high school, so being able to get out a day or two every month and go over to Disney was really a hoot! "Because cartoon characters have a large head in proportion to their bodies, they had this football helmet with a couple of holes punctured into it and her black hair painted on it for me to wear. By noon, I was practically fainting under those lights with this helmet on and it also inhibited my movement a great deal. So they finally took that off and just put a ribbon around my hair. "They took motion pictures of me and showed me the sections I was going to do. I continued for over a year and a half, going to the Studio a couple of days a month and working on ‘Snow White.’ By the time I was 15, they were nearly through. We had Louis Hightower as the Prince, we had Paul Godkin as the Wicked Witch, and a lot of dancers, because only dancers with proper training could really move correctly. They even put me in a big floppy coat, and I did a bunch of stuff for Dopey. "Everybody thought [the idea of a full-length animated movie] was crazy! But they were in love with it, and so was I – I was brought up on ‘Three Little Pigs’ and Mickey Mouse. We just had no idea the success that ‘Snow White’ would have. "I went on and did the Blue Fairy in ‘Pinocchio’ and the hippopotamus in ‘Fantasia’s Dance of the Hours.’ That was a whole different job – really I was doing the choreography, because they had other models more appropriately sized to actually portray the hippo. "I can see all of my movements in the character of Snow White! That was the way I moved and the way I danced. The interesting part is, when they first showed me the storyboards, Snow White looked a little more like Betty Boop – little tiny waist and big round eyes with eyelashes. And, by the time they started drawing me, the eyes had become almond-shaped. The hair was not my color, because I was sort of ash-blonde – but everything else, the nose and particularly the waistline, is like me. She was a much more real human character when they finished than she was originally imagined. "Walt Disney saw me a great deal, and he was very protective of me – I called him Uncle Walt. His daughter Diane had studied for two months with my father. He was a very proper gentleman. I don’t remember him coming down to the set very much – I think he viewed all the film, every single day, and would make suggestions to the directors. "My father let me work for Disney because it was a very safe place for me in show business. I got a little Model A Ford by the time I was 15 because you could get a license then if you had been taught to drive. It only went 40 miles an hour, but at least he didn’t have to drive me out to the Hyperion Studios every time they wanted me. "I think working with Disney gave me a great deal of self-confidence that I probably would not have had. I went to New York when I was 18. It helped me not to feel embarrassed if I was asked to do something eccentric or rather over the top. "I’m still in touch with the people who are left – there aren’t many. It’s been an extraordinary event in my life, being in movies and television and all the things that I’ve done, and it really all stemmed out of my beginnings and training at Disney Studios."

disneylandguru:

A graceful young girl twirls across the screen, and movie magic is born. The girl on the screen is Snow White, and the movie in which she appears, “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” will make screen history – Disney’s first full-length animated feature, a box-office phenomenon, and proof that animation could also be great art.

But behind the fictional dancing princess was a very real girl. Marge Champion was only 13 when she was interviewed to become the live-action model for Disney’s first Princess, dancing and acting on film so that the animators could study her movements and make Snow White seem as real as possible on-screen.  we sat down and spoke with Marge Champion about modeling Snow White, working with Walt Disney, and coming of age at the Walt Disney Studios. Below, in her own words, is what she told us:

 ”My father was Ernest Belcher, the dean of the West Coast dancing masters. A representative of Disney came to my father’s dance school and picked three of us out of the class to go to the Disney Studio to be interviewed. I was 13 when they interviewed me, and at the end of junior high school. I didn’t hear from them all summer and I had totally forgotten about the interview – then suddenly, in September, when I was 14, I got a call asking me to come to the Studio, because they wanted to fit me into a mock-up of the Snow White costume. I had started high school, so being able to get out a day or two every month and go over to Disney was really a hoot!

"Because cartoon characters have a large head in proportion to their bodies, they had this football helmet with a couple of holes punctured into it and her black hair painted on it for me to wear. By noon, I was practically fainting under those lights with this helmet on and it also inhibited my movement a great deal. So they finally took that off and just put a ribbon around my hair.

"They took motion pictures of me and showed me the sections I was going to do. I continued for over a year and a half, going to the Studio a couple of days a month and working on ‘Snow White.’ By the time I was 15, they were nearly through. We had Louis Hightower as the Prince, we had Paul Godkin as the Wicked Witch, and a lot of dancers, because only dancers with proper training could really move correctly. They even put me in a big floppy coat, and I did a bunch of stuff for Dopey.

"Everybody thought [the idea of a full-length animated movie] was crazy! But they were in love with it, and so was I – I was brought up on ‘Three Little Pigs’ and Mickey Mouse. We just had no idea the success that ‘Snow White’ would have.

"I went on and did the Blue Fairy in ‘Pinocchio’ and the hippopotamus in ‘Fantasia’s Dance of the Hours.’ That was a whole different job – really I was doing the choreography, because they had other models more appropriately sized to actually portray the hippo.

"I can see all of my movements in the character of Snow White! That was the way I moved and the way I danced. The interesting part is, when they first showed me the storyboards, Snow White looked a little more like Betty Boop – little tiny waist and big round eyes with eyelashes. And, by the time they started drawing me, the eyes had become almond-shaped. The hair was not my color, because I was sort of ash-blonde – but everything else, the nose and particularly the waistline, is like me. She was a much more real human character when they finished than she was originally imagined.

"Walt Disney saw me a great deal, and he was very protective of me – I called him Uncle Walt. His daughter Diane had studied for two months with my father. He was a very proper gentleman. I don’t remember him coming down to the set very much – I think he viewed all the film, every single day, and would make suggestions to the directors.

"My father let me work for Disney because it was a very safe place for me in show business. I got a little Model A Ford by the time I was 15 because you could get a license then if you had been taught to drive. It only went 40 miles an hour, but at least he didn’t have to drive me out to the Hyperion Studios every time they wanted me.

"I think working with Disney gave me a great deal of self-confidence that I probably would not have had. I went to New York when I was 18. It helped me not to feel embarrassed if I was asked to do something eccentric or rather over the top.

"I’m still in touch with the people who are left – there aren’t many. It’s been an extraordinary event in my life, being in movies and television and all the things that I’ve done, and it really all stemmed out of my beginnings and training at Disney Studios."

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kushandwizdom:

Words of Emotion

kushandwizdom:

Words of Emotion

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dulect:

yeah, I guess you could say i’m a model

image

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so-nerdy-it-hurts:

There are over 526 million black women in the world, all with different appearances, and your racist ass is going to say not liking black women is a ‘preference’, when the only damn thing they all got in common physically is their blackness? Sure, honey. 

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disneylandguru:

The next time you go to Mickey’s house, take your time going through it! It has a ton of “hidden Mickeys” in it, but it also has a ton of cleverly done “personal” things of Mickeys. in a glass case, just after you walk in, straight to the back wall, lower left corner…Mickey has a passport that is stamped in each area that a Disneyland is located, and it is stamped with the date that that Disneyland was opened. Lots of cleaver things.

disneylandguru:

The next time you go to Mickey’s house, take your time going through it! It has a ton of “hidden Mickeys” in it, but it also has a ton of cleverly done “personal” things of Mickeys. in a glass case, just after you walk in, straight to the back wall, lower left corner…Mickey has a passport that is stamped in each area that a Disneyland is located, and it is stamped with the date that that Disneyland was opened. Lots of cleaver things.

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